General news

User experience (UX) on a website

A good user experience on a website achieved through its regular improvement motivates users to use the pages more or for longer. If the experience of using the website is poor, then the visitor often leaves.

Follow us or send a message

Share with friends (or anyone else)

Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on whatsapp
Share on telegram
Share on email

User Experience (UX) refers to all aspects of the end-user experience with a company or its product/service (nngroup.com, 2021). In the case of a website or e-commerce, it means the user’s overall experience of finding pages on the website and accessing the pages to use the pages and find information or purchase a product/service. The user experience for the website may end there, but it can also continue if, for example, the customer makes changes to the order made from the online store or returns to the website for some other reason. For the company, the overall user experience continues as long as the customer is active with the company.

A good user experience on a website achieved through its regular improvement motivates users to use the pages more or for longer. If the experience of using the website is poor, then the visitor often leaves quickly and starts looking for a solution to their problem elsewhere. The starting point for user-centered thinking is to feel empathy for the user. You can’t just think about what a product or service does, or what the end result is. You also have to think about how the user experience feels.

In an online store, a good example of a user experience can be, for example, adding a product to a shopping cart. If adding to the shopping cart directly opens the Shopping Cart on a separate subpage, but the user would like to buy more products, then he has to return to the store page via the menu. In most cases, it is not a good idea to open the shopping cart automatically when the probability of buying more than one product is high. Moving the product to the shopping cart is successful in both example cases, but going to the cart relatively imperceptibly, with only a small hint of successful addition without interrupting the user experience, feels better to the user.

In user-driven user experience design, the primary consideration is how the use of the website feels and what emotions it evokes in the user. It can be tempting to do something on the site thinking only of what feels clear or competent. However, from the point of view of the user experience, it is necessary to find out what is clear or functional in the opinion of the end-user of the pages, ie in the case of e-commerce, the customer. Most visitors should be able to use the site without outside help or guidance. Sometimes an entrepreneur can also go blind to his or her own actions and assume that users have the same knowledge as himself or herself.

SOURCES

The Definition of User Experience, NNGroup.com, https://www.nngroup.com/articles/definition-user-experience/ .Accessed 6.6.2021

UX — A quick glance about The 5 Elements of User Experience, (Part 2), Medium.com, https://medium.com/omarelgabrys-blog/ux-a-quick-glance-about-the-5-elements-of-user-experience-part-2-a0da8798cd52 .Accessed 2.6.2021

Think like a UX designer, bootcamp.uxdesign.cc, https://bootcamp.uxdesign.cc/  .Accessed 2.6.2021

Share with friends (or anyone else)

Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on whatsapp
Share on telegram
Share on email

Want a newsletter?

From time to time, we’ll send you information about new services, features, and other website or marketing related topics. You can easily unsubscribe whenever you receive a newsletter.

Please note that the newsletter is in Finnish only